23rd July

dreamasthoughyoullneverdie:

he is literally to perfect. 

23rd July

thediaryofthewallflower:

myfart0:

stop-chicken-nugget-abuse:

nevvzealand:

happy birthday someone

I like reblog going this becaUSE WHAT IF YOU SAW THIS ON YOUR BIRTHDAY HOW COOL WOULD THAT BE

HELL YEAH HELL FRICKIN YEAH HAPPY BIRTHDAY ME

THANKS STRANGER

Forever reblog!!! Happy birthday to someone

23rd July
20th July
alessiapelonzi:

PRINTS AVAILABLE HERE!
"Welcome Home"
Here’s my last (sigh) tribute to Norman Rockwell's art for #letsdrawsherlock!
This is a pretty sentimental version of Sherlock’s homecoming. And home is not only 221B Baker Street, but the place where his affections live. Home is where his friends are.
From left to right: Mike Stamford, Mrs Hudson, Anthea, Lestrade, Angelo, Mary Morstan, Anderson, Mycroft Holmes, Sally Donovan, Molly Hooper and DI Dimmock. And obviously, before them, John Watson and Sherlock Holmes.
Here below you can see Christmas Homecoming, Rockwell’s wonderful painting that inspired me:

alessiapelonzi:

PRINTS AVAILABLE HERE!

"Welcome Home"

Here’s my last (sigh) tribute to Norman Rockwell's art for #letsdrawsherlock!

This is a pretty sentimental version of Sherlock’s homecoming. And home is not only 221B Baker Street, but the place where his affections live. Home is where his friends are.

From left to right: Mike Stamford, Mrs Hudson, Anthea, Lestrade, Angelo, Mary Morstan, Anderson, Mycroft Holmes, Sally Donovan, Molly Hooper and DI Dimmock. And obviously, before them, John Watson and Sherlock Holmes.

Here below you can see Christmas Homecoming, Rockwell’s wonderful painting that inspired me:

Christmas Homecoming

19th July
Benedict means ”blessed.” My parents liked the sound of the name and felt slightly blessed because they’d been trying for a child for a very long time.
19th July

flustered-fallen-angel:

flustered-fallen-angel:

elizaethian:

castiel-is-a-bluebird:

watchtheskytonight:

robotunicorncastiel:

theironangel:

destielforcanon:

theironangel:

andyourheartgoespop:

theperksofbeingawallbagel:

theironangel:

“Shit Cas does when not with the Winchesters” 

Cas: theironangel

Gifs made by: withthishammeri

I thought this was really from the show

And then he wades fully clothed into the ocean and stands up to his waist in the water, suit sopping wet. Angels need days off too!

image

holy fuck cas stop

image

No.

Cosplaying: you’re doing it right.

THIS IS LITERALLY THE CUTEST THING EVER AND IT GETS AN AUTOMATIC REBLOG EVERY TIME

THIS FANDOM

THIS IS A COSPLAY I THOUGHT IT WAS MISHA WHAT

THIS IS THE LITERAL CUTEST THING I LOVE YOU

I LOVE THIS SO MUCH

19th July
tillieke:

happybirthdaybenedict:

Happy Birthday Benedict!
I’m not very good at birthday wishes so why not just draw silly things on my own drawing instead ;)
Hope you have a lovely day! -x

Have some silly stuff for today, because why not :P

tillieke:

happybirthdaybenedict:

Happy Birthday Benedict!

I’m not very good at birthday wishes so why not just draw silly things on my own drawing instead ;)

Hope you have a lovely day! -x

Have some silly stuff for today, because why not :P

18th July

elvesarebad:

i saw a gifset and ended up watching the entire show: a novel by me

18th July

mamalaz:

Gangsta Avengers AU

Wherein the avengers are a secret vigilante group that eventually find each other and go after criminals the hard way.

18th July
about-faces:

moon-crater:

charliehadalittlewolf:

tuhhveit:

elsiesmarina:

themightyquinn666:

sorry everyone

Excuse me.
One of the first women to start her own independent production company.
Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles.
Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to.
Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image.
Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting.
Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando.
Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself.
Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s. 
One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse.
One of the first people to openly support gay rights.
Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation.
Donated her time and money to these charities.
Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there.
Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century
Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans.
Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model? 

marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there

and let’s not forget this

Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again.
"She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it." - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

Let’s also talk about how every single one of her marriages involved some form of abuse, yet she still managed to be Marilyn Fucking Monroe and achieve iconic status that has lasted more than half a century. Like, for example, during filming of The Seven Year Itch, her husband at the time, Joe DiMaggio, beat her because he found her appearance in the iconic white dress—you know the one—to be too revealing.
Despite this, she went right back to work, and made one of the most iconic comedies of all time with make-up covering her bruises. Then, she divorced him. That might not seem like such a big deal now, but Joe DiMaggio was one of America’s most loved icons at the time, and divorce was still very, very frowned on. It could have irreparably damaged her career to divorce him, yet she did it.
Some of her most critically acclaimed films were made while she was married to Arthur Miller, who verbally abused her, put her down and constantly tried to tell her how she should do her job—a job she had been successful at for many years before he met her, I might add. Yet, even with this continued pushback at home in her relationship, she still made films that are considered some of her greatest.
During filming of The Prince and the Showgirl, her co-star Laurence Olivier—THE Laurence Olivier, one of the original HUGE actors of Golden Age Hollywood and a force to be reckoned with—bullied her on set and off, yet she still performed. Later, he would regret this and say that she was a fine actress who didn’t deserve his asshole-ish treatment of her.
Nude photos of Marilyn were bought by Hugh Hefner and published in the very first issue of Playboy, helping to launch an entire publishing empire, but instead of showing shame as would have been expected of a woman in such a predicament at the time, she shrugged off criticism, explaining simply, honestly, that she needed the money and wasn’t ashamed in the least.
Additionally, Marilyn struggled with severe anxiety. She had to steel herself before every day’s shooting just to go out on set and act, and though this caused many delays, she still did her job. Besides that, she had endometriosis, which is not exactly a picnic and can be a cause of severe chronic pain. She also had nervous breakdowns on more than one occasion, but recovered and went right back to work because she was a professional, God damn.
She was a woman who pushed to make movies that, without her involvement, might never have seen the light of day. Even though she never got to star in them, she was instrumental in getting such films as The Brothers Karamazov made through sheer force of will.
She read constantly, voraciously, and openly lamented her “dumb blonde” image in the media—not that anyone stopped calling her one. She wrote poetry. She worked tirelessly to become a better actress. Even as she was mocked and bullied by other professionals, studio muckety mucks and the gossip rags, she never gave up.
Though she experienced many difficulties in physical, emotional and societal contexts, some that she only just barely overcame, she fought her way through them.
So don’t you dare say she isn’t a role model. Sure, the iconic face, the reduction of her personality to nothing but pop art, that may not be a role model, but the flesh and blood woman behind the image most certainly fucking was. She was human. She had flaws. She had problems. She had fears and doubts. She had a traumatic history. She lived with these things, fought them, overcame them and here we are, fifty years after her death still talking about how amazing she was, all that she accomplished and everything she helped pave the way for. That certainly seems like the very definition of a role model to me.

#DO NOT EVEN GO THERE I WILL SMITE YOU

about-faces:

moon-crater:

charliehadalittlewolf:

tuhhveit:

elsiesmarina:

themightyquinn666:

sorry everyone

Excuse me.

  • One of the first women to start her own independent production company.
  • Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles.
  • Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to.
  • Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image.
  • Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting.
  • Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando.
  • Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself.
  • Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s. 
  • One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse.
  • One of the first people to openly support gay rights.
  • Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation.
  • Donated her time and money to these charities.
  • Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there.
  • Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century
  • Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans.

Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model? 

marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there

and let’s not forget this

Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again.

"She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it." - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

Let’s also talk about how every single one of her marriages involved some form of abuse, yet she still managed to be Marilyn Fucking Monroe and achieve iconic status that has lasted more than half a century. Like, for example, during filming of The Seven Year Itch, her husband at the time, Joe DiMaggio, beat her because he found her appearance in the iconic white dress—you know the one—to be too revealing.

Despite this, she went right back to work, and made one of the most iconic comedies of all time with make-up covering her bruises. Then, she divorced him. That might not seem like such a big deal now, but Joe DiMaggio was one of America’s most loved icons at the time, and divorce was still very, very frowned on. It could have irreparably damaged her career to divorce him, yet she did it.

Some of her most critically acclaimed films were made while she was married to Arthur Miller, who verbally abused her, put her down and constantly tried to tell her how she should do her job—a job she had been successful at for many years before he met her, I might add. Yet, even with this continued pushback at home in her relationship, she still made films that are considered some of her greatest.

During filming of The Prince and the Showgirl, her co-star Laurence Olivier—THE Laurence Olivier, one of the original HUGE actors of Golden Age Hollywood and a force to be reckoned with—bullied her on set and off, yet she still performed. Later, he would regret this and say that she was a fine actress who didn’t deserve his asshole-ish treatment of her.

Nude photos of Marilyn were bought by Hugh Hefner and published in the very first issue of Playboy, helping to launch an entire publishing empire, but instead of showing shame as would have been expected of a woman in such a predicament at the time, she shrugged off criticism, explaining simply, honestly, that she needed the money and wasn’t ashamed in the least.

Additionally, Marilyn struggled with severe anxiety. She had to steel herself before every day’s shooting just to go out on set and act, and though this caused many delays, she still did her job. Besides that, she had endometriosis, which is not exactly a picnic and can be a cause of severe chronic pain. She also had nervous breakdowns on more than one occasion, but recovered and went right back to work because she was a professional, God damn.

She was a woman who pushed to make movies that, without her involvement, might never have seen the light of day. Even though she never got to star in them, she was instrumental in getting such films as The Brothers Karamazov made through sheer force of will.

She read constantly, voraciously, and openly lamented her “dumb blonde” image in the media—not that anyone stopped calling her one. She wrote poetry. She worked tirelessly to become a better actress. Even as she was mocked and bullied by other professionals, studio muckety mucks and the gossip rags, she never gave up.

Though she experienced many difficulties in physical, emotional and societal contexts, some that she only just barely overcame, she fought her way through them.

So don’t you dare say she isn’t a role model. Sure, the iconic face, the reduction of her personality to nothing but pop art, that may not be a role model, but the flesh and blood woman behind the image most certainly fucking was. She was human. She had flaws. She had problems. She had fears and doubts. She had a traumatic history. She lived with these things, fought them, overcame them and here we are, fifty years after her death still talking about how amazing she was, all that she accomplished and everything she helped pave the way for. That certainly seems like the very definition of a role model to me.